Trump says likely to nominate a woman to succeed Ginsburg on Supreme Court

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Democrats are still seething over the Republican Senate’s refusal in 2016 to act on Democratic President Barack Obama’s Supreme Court nominee, Merrick Garland to replace conservative Justice Antonin Scalia, who died 10 months before that election.

At the time, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the Senate should not act on a nominee during an election year, but he and other top Republican senators have reversed that stance.

Even if Democrats win the White House and a Senate majority in the November election, Trump and McConnell might be able to push through their choice before the new president and Congress are sworn in on Jan. 20.

Senior congressional Democrats raised the prospect of adding more justices next year to counterbalance Trump’s nominees if they win control of the White House and Senate.

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“Let me be clear: if Leader McConnell and Senate Republicans move forward with this, then nothing is off the table for next year,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer told fellow Democrats on a Saturday conference call, according to a source who listened to the call.

McConnell, who has made confirmation of Trump’s federal judicial nominees a priority, said the chamber would vote on any Trump nominee. Democrats, with few tools to block passage of a nominee, plan to try to rally public opposition.

“The focus needs to be showing the public what’s at stake in this fight. And what’s at stake is really people’s access to affordable healthcare, workers’ rights and women’s rights,” said Democratic Senator Chris Van Hollen in a telephone interview.

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